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On a Saturday evening in January 1983, a platoon of red-bereted soldiers drove down the dusty main road of Thembani Dube’s village in western Zimbabwe and set up camp at the missionary school. 

The following morning, Mr Dube recalls, he heard shots ring out from the direction of the school as they executed three local men. Later that evening, there was more shooting – this time from a clinic where school staff lived.  

“They lined up the teachers against the wall, told the headmaster to read from the bible, and shot them,” he told the Telegraph. 

“The teacher at the end of the line survived, and he crawled all through the night until he ended up at our house where my mother tried to patch him up.

Margaret Thatcher's government ignored reports of massacres by troops loyal to Robert Mugabe (R), an academic claims

Margaret Thatcher’s government ignored reports of massacres by troops loyal to Robert Mugabe (R), an academic claims

Credit:
Tim Ockenden/PA

“I remember they used my rain coat to stop the bleeding. I woke up in the morning and there was this guy with a gaping hole in his left side sitting by the fire place,” he added. 

The ten-year old…